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The State of AI Regulations in 2023

January 16, 2023

This year, 2023, the groundwork will be laid for the EU AI Act to take effect within the next two years, prompting the establishment of risk management frameworks. In the United States, the focus will be on how regulatory bodies and case law lead the pack in targeting companies that proliferate algorithmic discrimination or intentionally use bad data, and dark patterns.

2022 signalled a strong year for artificial intelligence (AI) and what is to come. The end was marked by the introduction of ChatGPT and within the first weeks of 2023, Microsoft has been in talks to invest 10 billion dollars into the parent company, OpenAI. This would accelerate the already fast-moving adoption of AI across industry, bringing ChatGPT into daily used tools such as Microsoft Suite. This is an echo of projections that the global revenue of the AI market is set to grow by 19.6% each year and reach $500 billion this year. With the ubiquitous proliferation of AI, there has also been a similarly paced regulatory focus.

The momentum of 2022, which saw the general approach to the EU AI Act adopted in December, the publishing of the United States (US) AI Bill of Rights in October, the UK’s AI Regulation Policy Paper in July, and the enforcement of China’s Algorithmic Recommendation Management Provisions in March, has set a strong precedent of what is to come.

This year, 2023, the groundwork will be laid for the EU AI Act to take effect within the next two years, prompting the establishment of risk management frameworks. In the United States, the focus will be on how regulatory bodies and case law lead the pack in targeting companies that proliferate algorithmic discrimination or intentionally use bad data, and dark patterns.

There may also be contention between understanding where AI is being regulated in silo (EU AI Act) and how it is also being regulated through other pieces of legislation, both existing laws and those that have recently come into effect (i.e., the Digital Services Act and the Digital Markets Act).

Lastly, whereas China was once the inspiration for EU lawmakers to prohibit social scoring by algorithmic systems in the EU AI Act, the Asian powerhouse is now silently leading the AI regulatory playbook, and 2023 might see others borrowing from their precedent.

Looking at the four global leaders in the AI regulatory eco-system, this publication sheds light on current approaches to regulation, while providing high-level breakdowns of what to watch for in 2023 and commenting on what this means for AI governance going forward.

The State of AI Regulations in 2023

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The State of AI Regulations in 2023

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